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Handbook of Condition Monitoring

Techniques and Methodology

by A. Davies (ed.)

1998 Chapman & Hall
Printed in Great Britain by T.J. International Ltd, Padstow, Cornwall
ISBN 0 412 61320 4

Contents

10 Commercial applications of performance monitoring
A. Davies, K.F. Martin and P. Thorpe
240
10.1 Introduction 240
10.2 Bearing performance 242
10.3 Ballscrew performance 249
10.4 Pump performance 256
10.5 Machine performance 262
10.6 Conclusions 264
10.7 References 264

PART FOURTechniques for Vibration Monitoring

267
11 Review of fundamental vibration theory
D. Gardiner
269
11.1 Introduction 269
11.2 Measuring vibration 272
11.3 Frequency 275
11.4 Phase 276
11.5 Vibration analysis 280
11.6 Complex vibration 285
11.7 Vibration severity 286
11.8 Velocity RMS 288
11.9 High-frequency detection systems 291
11.10 Vibration and predictive maintenance 294
11.11 Monitoring machine vibration 299
11.12 Conclusions 301
11.13 Acknowledgments 302
11.14 References 302

12 Common vibration monitoring techniques
J. Mathew
303
12.1 Introduction 303
12.2 The time domain 307
12.3 The frequency domain 313
12.4 The frequency domain 318
12.5 Conclusions 320
12.6 References 321
Appendix Equations for common vibration monitoring techniques 322

13 Fundamentals of vibroacoustical condition monitoring
C. Cempel
324
13.1 Introduction 324
13.2 Wear and vibroacoustic phenomena in machines 325
13.3 Machines as energy processors 329
13.4 Machinery as a hierarchy of energy processors 334
13.5 Symptom reliability uninterrupted operating systems 339
13.6 Condition assessment, system residual life and symptom reliability 343
13.7 Example of machine life predictions by ETS theory 348
13.8 Conclusions 351
13.9 References 351

14 Commercial applications of vibration monitoring
P. Shrieve and J. Hill
354
14.1 Introduction 354
14.2 Gas compressor train monitoring 356
14.3 Power generation train monitoring (a) 359
14.4 Power generation train monitoring (b) 362
14.5 Aeroderivative gas turbine monitoring 364
14.6 The ATL approach 366
14.7 Expert system application 369
14.8 Conclusions 374
14.9 References 374

PART FIVETechniques for Wear Debris Analysis 375
15 Detection and diagnosis of wear through oil and wear debris analysis
A.L. Price and B.J. Roylance
377
15.1 Introduction 377
15.2 Wear in lubricated systems 383
15.3 Wear debris - transport, monitoring efficiency and analysis 392
15.4 Lubricant properties and oil analysis methods 395
15.5 Wear debris analysis methods 401
15.6 Physical testing of lubricants 412
15.7 Implementation of wear debris monitoring and oil analysis programmes 414
15.8 Conclusions 415
15.9 Bibliography 419